Infopoverty World Conference 15 Years: 2001 – 2015 The Digital Revolution in the words of the lead players

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For more informations consulting http://www.infopoverty.net/

We are announcing the publication of

Infopoverty World Conference.

15 Years: 2001 – 2015

The Digital Revolution in the words of the lead players

Detailed and accurate summary of what was discussed at the conferences taking place at the United Nations Headquarter in New York.

The memorandum is introduced by the author and presented over 600 pages, gathers with order to display all the speeches that have marked and defined the issues addressed. To, the Final Declaration as well as synthesize addressed during the sessions concludes the journey every year proposing the agenda for resolution of issues advanced; more space is dedicated to significant experiences.

The work represents a useful and important summa of the experience of cooperation between the United Nations and OCCAM, tracing the path faced over the last 15 years.

Introduction by

Pierpaolo Saporito

President of OCCAM and Infopoverty

The last intense 15 years were characterized by the emergence and affirmation of digital revolutions. Our lives change in every part of the word, involving progressively all the population. In few time everyone became connected and old habits were dismissed, new generations sign the discontinuity of the social behaviors.

After the proclamation of the Millennium Development Goals by the UN in 2000, a flow of innovations accelerated the process of development in many different ways, but substantially it is based on the web. A new territory was discovered, virtual maybe, but able to create real ones. New protocols for finance, governance, economy, health, education and culture imposed by ICTs (Information and Communications Technologies) changed deeply the societies.

OCCAM was born officially in 1997, as a UNESCO Observatory for Cultural and Audiovisual Communication, in the ambit of the Mediterranean Program, with the mission to explore the new frontiers opened by ICT and to elaborate researches, proposals, projects and plans able to drive these innovations to the social-economic development of disadvantaged communities.

A long navigation started into an unknown land of thousand temporary and evanescent applications, mostly created for commercial purposes, to search how to share the best to solve the poor people’s needs.

In 2000 After 3 year of studies OCCAM, assuming its full institutional autonomy under the aegis of the UN, decided to act directly and experiment on the ground the discovered solutions: the appeal of UNESCO to help the remote villages in Honduras destroyed by the hurricane Mitch was taken in charge, launching an initiative for the villages of San Ramon and San Francisco in Lempira, finalized to push the poor communities into the road of development, for which computers and connectivity were instrumental to re-wake their capacity to transform the potentiality of local resources into real goods able to improve their lives.

Thanks to the use of the first satellite capable to transmit broadband internet (120mb/s, by On- Sat-Net, a Mormon company) and in collaboration with the local government (Mr. Gerardo Zepeda Bermudez, Ministry of Technology) and partners like Oklahoma University (Prof. John Steffens), UNESCO (Mrs. Mendiate de Badaroux, President of the General Assembly) and the Inter – American Development Bank (IADB), we were able to progressively launch educational courses, health assistance, remote training on food security, promotion by e-commerce of local craftsmanship, starting a process of participation, by sharing knowledge, and problem solving in remote advising ways.

The success of this experience was highly significant: the fact the some indigenous pupils in few months were able to become tutors to American classes, as stated by the Oklahoma University, demonstrate that anyone, even in poorest conditions can reach better conditions and self-sufficiency, thanks to a proper use of new technologies oriented to empower his capacities. The first ICT villages were born.

Because of the amazing deriving interest and of the wide request to show methods and results, in line with the MDGs, we began to think about a public meeting. So, in 2001, the first Infopoverty World Conference (IWC 1) named Possible solutions was held. Pioneers of the incoming digital revolution participated, providing proposals and considerations, that are still valid. A new vision was going to be affirmed, stressing not only commercial innovations, rather their social applications, full of great potentiality, towards 5,5 billion of needy population.

The movement began as well as the continuity of initiated projects, enlarged to several countries: in 2002, the second Conference (IWC II), From possible solutions to action, gave birth to the Infopoverty Program, that put together the results of the conference in order to empower them and let them be accessible to everybody, opening a new phase: the program attracted the attention of big institutions, both public and private, which regarded the Conference as an updating forum and synthesis of ICTs for the social sphere.

In 2003, the third IWC, named New tools and best practices, acquired a governmental level, thanks to the presence of Armida de Lopez Contreras, Vice-President of Honduras, who showed the results of the last four years in the ICT Villages. Further, the presence of the US. Ambassador John Negroponte and of the US. Deputy Ministry of Commerce Cris Israel, who took advantage to announce the launch of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, one of the most influencing organization in the American politics, marked a change in the Conference’s role. This new role was then consolidated on December 2003, thanks to the invitation to participate to the first phase of the World Summit Information Society (WSIS) in Geneva: there, the “ICT Village” model was formalized in occasion of a specific seminar held at the same time, during which Jim Wales, another digital revolution’s protagonist, showed the Wikipedia project.

The increasing participation of high-level spokespersons from all over the world induced us to held the 2004’s Conference, focused on the New frontiers of ICTs: services for development, at the UN Headquarter. Thanks to this change of location, the Conference was enhanced with new satellite technologies of videoconference (Eutelsat), giving the possibility to directly participate at the works to Heads of States, campesinos, Ministries, academicians, researchers, UN representatives, avoiding annoying dislocations and multiplying the use of best practices – as the Navaho Nation Program, where the concept of e-services began to be practically affirmed. On February, on the initiative of the Oklahoma University and OCCAM, the Infopoverty Institute was created: it would have been an academic center of the vision at the basis of the conference and a valid support for the future editions.

The year of 2005 was dedicated to the WSIS in Tunis and the IWC V was structured on it, thanks to the topic, Actors and Strategies for Development: digital technology to fight poverty: it represented a productive premises for the next debates, pointing out the main themes and solutions. During the Tunis Summit, the Infopoverty Program and OCCAM were invited to develop a series of avant-garde initiatives, through:

  • the implementation and management of the Summit’s television, WSIS-TV, with a staff of Navaho operators, previously trained for the Navaho program – Infopoverty antenna;
  • the launch of a specific cooperation MoU for the realization of the Indigenous people program, in collaboration with ITU;
  • the realization of an experimental ICT village in Borju Ettouil, as operative demo for the applicator model in Honduras and South Lebanon, validated in the previous phase of the WSIS 2003 in Geneva;
  • the launch of the WSIS-Infopoverty seminar, headed by the Tunisian Ministry for Cooperation, Ben Mammouth: widely promoted by media, it attracted the interest of various Governments, as Madagascar for which its President asked for the launch of the ICT villages

– Infopoverty program in his country.

In 2006, the IWC VI, Fighting poverty to create prosperity for all, stressed topics as how to conquer prosperity starting from the most disadvantaged and far situations, contrasting the digital divide, that is going to separate wide population’s areas from progress, and taking advantage of the experimentation in Madagascar: the latter is showing the way to provide free broadband connectivity, thanks to proper laws, to primary structures as hospitals, schools, centers of research, using public property’s frequencies. These actions, empowered with the training of more than 100 national experts about the use of ICTs and mobile devices for telemedicine and food security, allowed for the creations of new governmental intervention policies for development, showed during the first Infopoverty Exhibition that took place in autumn in the Milan Fair’s pavilions, and saw the participation of 32 partners’ stands, the operative reconstruction of one ICT village and a radio-TV station transmitting live events.

In 2007, there was the IWC VII, Harnessing the use of ICTs towards the MDG: the Conference enlarged the discussion linking it to MDGs, following the reached results in Sambaina, that in the meanwhile had been proclaimed UN Millennium Village by the Committee headed by Jeffry Sachs. There, it had been possible to register a clear improvement of the community’s life conditions, from maternal care point of view (with a 87% decrease of mortality due to delivery), job creations for the capacity of enhancing the production of crops, and increased e-commerce exchanges, increased education and training, and giving more efficiency to governance, thanks to the specific pilot applications, then extended to the whole country. These results were discussed during a specific lunch session of the ECOSOC Annual Ministerial Review (AMR) in Geneva, and showed in a stand given to OCCAM at the Innovation Fair opened at the Palais des Nations.

The 2008 IWC, Low cost – smart technologies to fight poverty and save the planet, faced the broad topic of the market of technologies, showing that a development of markets can be reached through low cost better technologies, and encouraging companies and governments to push toward this tendency, also in relation to the climate change’s effects. In this occasion, the Infopoverty Program presented its realizations in the network of the ICT Villages, created in Peru, in South Lebanon and Lesotho.

ICT’s good use, abuse, refuse towards the MDGs was the topic of the IWC IX, in 2009. The abuse that sometime results in new technologies, with speculative practices, was denounced, together with the long-lasting refusal by traditional ruling elites which are insensitive to change; correct uses for the benefit of populations were showed, as new forms of enlarged participation and pressure for ommon well-being, especially regarding new generations. Several trials have been validated and then shared at the ECOSOC AMR in Geneva, during a specific lunch session.

The tenth IWC, on How the digital revolution can defeat poverty in 2010, better defined the concept of digital revolution and how it can effectively fight poverty, adding the increasing experiences spread around the world, on behalf of several subjects, especially young people: new operative scenarios have been created, following the creation of IPhones and Ipads, able to enhance the performances of mobile phones, and on this way the ICT village in Mahobong (Lesotho) was launched, in order to experiment more efficient forms of support to Food Security.

2011, E-services: New Paradigms for Development. Innovations enlarge the capacity of new devices that overcome the ordinary computers and permit to provide wider mobility services, for a further optimization of several trials and it enlarges the circle of users: the new concept of e-services as new action paradigm moves forward, and it calls for the companies in order not to use these services as gadgets or leisure means, but as proper work’s tools for the support of crafts and needs of disadvantaged populations, as highlighted in the experiences of Mahobong about food security, with results in the field of appreciation of the relevant local agricultural resources.

To give strength to the Conference, it was created the first Signs of change Film Festival, inspired by the UN mission and dedicated to movies showing this kind of actions, also to reach the MDGs. The first edition was presented during the conference at the Tribeca Cinemas in New York, organized in collaboration with the United Nations Association Film Festival (UNAFF, headed by Jasmine Boijc) and the Conseil International du cinema et de la television (CICT-UNESCO with the Secretary General, Lola Poggi Goujon).

The IWC XII, named Who drives the digital revolution, posed a fundamental question: who are the actors and which is the conclusion of the digital revolution, which are the provoked effects and who is taking advantage of it? The spokespersons’ replies were brilliant and revealed changing situations in the financial field, in the social, economic, behavioral ones, never explored. The result regarded the role of the United Nations that has to be highlighted in order to optimize the digital revolution’s advantages, avoiding damages, and most of all to orient the revolution in synergy with the MDGs, which seems to confirm themselves as development lighthouse. At the same time, there has been a strong increase of the participation to the Signs of change Film Festival 2, with plays and famous artists.

Innovations for nation building and the empowerment of people, was the title of the IWC in 2013. The impact of ancient societies with modernity has often been traumatic, because they absorb unsustainable models and are source of more inconveniences for the population. The same technological gap can be source of further exclusion if not adequately faced, instead of being an accelerator for communitarian relationships and social assets. To build or re-build nations is a topic that, in digital terms opens to enthusiastic perspectives, since permits to nations to avoid every step of traditional evolution, but immediately be advanced, becoming leader in solutions, as money transfer, e-governance, and access to education and sanitary assistance, otherwise unreachable. A step that can be inspirational even for modern societies, of which the reconstruction is seen by many. In the meanwhile, the Signs of change Film Festival 3 registered a particular success: Innocente, the selected movie, won the Oscar for documentaries, and its showing was held at the Dag Hammarsfiold Theater of the United Nations. An important follow up about the Conference’s results, took place at the ECOSOC AMR in Geneva, where OCCAM-Infopoverty is invited to expose the e-services experimentations (e-learning, telemedicine, food security) applied to the ICT villages’ network, at the Innovation Fair.

The title for the 2014 IWC was How digital revolution can accelerate MDGs and help the launch of SDGs. In the synthesis of the parallel actions developed by Infopoverty in the MDGs’ framework during the last 14 years, the factors that led to the acceleration of the objectives were underlined, factors that register worthy performances, and that are essential basis for the debate launched toward SDGs. In order to favor this process, the study of digital services platform began, able to catalyze the best competences for the solution of needs of poorest populations. An efficient architecture capable of transferring knowledge and including all the subjects in the development process, both service providers or service users, implemented by the new generation of sensors and robotic devices. A specific application of the digital service platform was presented in September at the XXth Euro-Mediterranean Conference in Hammamet, where the project E-MedMed on telemedicine was launched. The Euro-Mediterranean Conference on Communication is equally organized by OCCAM on the wake of the Barcelona Agreements and it takes place since more than twenty years. The practical realization of services is the main topic studied in parallel by both the Euro- Mediterranean Conference and the Infopoverty World Conference; while the former is focused on the specific framework of the Mediterranean region, the latter has a broader range. With the 2015 Infopoverty World Conference, Next Sustainable Development Goals: The challenge before the digital era, ended a cycle, in parallel with the MDGs, of which the Conference followed, step by step, the evolution within the UN family, exploring opportunities provided by the digital revolution, which opened a new era of projectable sustainability and new capacities that technologies offer to humanity. In 2001 we were around 6 billion, nowadays we are more than 7 billion. In the past, whole areas were unknown, while now it is possible to visit each street through screens; in the past developed countries were the only one to have good telephone connections, while now everyone is connected, free to be in touch with anybody. The digital era has already began, without borders, gender divisions, money is also present in the virtual world, there is an unlimited access to knowledge thanks to Wikipedia and Google, the dream of the hippy generation became reality. Will the current generation be able to take profit for everybody, or will it generate new nightmares and conflicts?

The Conference will continue to take place in the spirits of the SDGs, paying attention in observing and signaling opportunities and risks.

The Observatory for Cultural and Audiovisual Communication in the Mediterranean and in the World (OCCAM) was created by UNESCO in 1996. Since 2003 has been formally associated to the UN Department of Public Information and since 2005 it enjoys Special Consultative Status with the ECOSOC. OCCAM’s activities are articulated as follows:

Observatory for the analysis and understanding of ICT for Development trends and strategies, it prepares researches and special issues on technologies and best practices able to contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals

Acting agency of the Infopoverty Programme, its main aim is that of duplicating the successful ICT Village Model. The ICT Village model is intended to provide to remote and disadvantaged communities broadband satellite connectivity as well as e-services for development, such as telemedicine, e-learning, e-governance, etc. Besides, it partners with institutions, academia, R&D agencies to develop innovative services for development, such as those for food security that were presented in recent years and are now being delivered in the ICT Village of Lesotho.

In order to make the ICT Village sustainable, renewable energy (solar, biomasses, compound, hydrogen, etc.) as well as water sanitation systems are put into place, and are matched with continuous training and support aimed at the empowerment of the members of the community and the full exploitation of the natural and human potentials.

Since 2001 OCCAM has organised the Infopoverty World Conference, which is held on a yearly basis at the UN Headquarters in New York and simultaneously in prestigious seats connected by videoconference. Since 2001 more than 1000 institutions and leaders have participated in the event, making possible a very fruitful exchange of best practices and converging activities. Moreover, implementing the Final Declaration endorsed by the Infopoverty World Conference 2006, OCCAM has organised the first Infopoverty Exhibition, held in February 2007 at the Milan fairground, where the most interesting innovations in the field of ICT4D, safe water and renewable energies to be used in the ICT Villages and in development projects of the UN System were presented. Finally, OCCAM every year exploits the important framework of the Venice Film Festival to organise the Euromediterranean Conference on Cinema, intended as an occasion where to present to the wide audience present at the festival some of the results of its activities and individuate possible partners.

Since 2006 OCCAM is leading the activities of the Infopoverty Community of Expertise “E-services for Development” within the UN Global Alliance for ICT and Development, whose participants include some of the most important stakeholders of the information society. The Infopoverty Community of Expertise works in close relationship with the OCCAM-LAB, aimed at testing and individuating special tools that can be used in disadvantaged communities.

I’m proud to say that OCCAM is present in the Web UN TV  since 2009 with an amount of almost 300 hours.

SUMMARY

I Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………….. 25

Themes of the I Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 29

Introductive speech – Pierpaolo Saporito, OCCAM President…………………………………………………………………………………………………29

Outlines of an action plan to combat Infopoverty – Pierpaolo Saporito, OCCAM President……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 31

Messages……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 40

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………………. 44

II Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………….47

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………………49

Themes of the II Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 51

Introductive Speech: Pierpaolo Saporito – OCCAM President…………………………………………………………………………………………………52

Conference report…………………………………………………………………………………….55

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………………59

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………………..61

III Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………. 63

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………………65

Themes of the III Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………………. 68

Introductive Speech: Pierpaolo Saporito – President, OCCAM………………………………………………… …………………………………………….. 69

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………….. 70

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………………. 74

IV Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………. 77

Themes of the IV Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………………. 83

Introductive Speech: Pierpaolo Saporito – President, OCCAM…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 84

Conference report…………………………………………………………………………………….85

Messages……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 99

Final Declaration………………………………………………………………………………….. 104

V Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………….. 107

Agenda…………………………………………………………………………………………………109

Themes of the V Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………………112

Introductive Speech – Pierpaolo Saporito, Presidente di OCCAM………………………………………………………………………………………………..113

Conference report……………………………………………………………………………….. 114

Messages……………………………………………………………………………………………. 134

VI Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………. 139

Agenda………………………………………………………………………………………………… 141

Themes of the VI Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………………146

Introductive Speech – Pierpaolo Saporito………………………………………………………………………………………………. 147

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………….148

Messages………………………………………………………………………………………………168

Final Speech -Pierpaolo Saporito………………………………………………………………………………………………. 171

Final Declaration…………………………………………………………………………………..173

VII Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………. 177

Agenda………………………………………………………………………………………………. 179

Themes of the VII Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………. 184

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………………………….185

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………… 206

Final Declaration………………………………………………………………………………..207

VIII Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………….. 209

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………… 211

Themes of the VII Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………… 219

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………. 219

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………… 221

Final Declaration…………………………………………………………………………………224

IX Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………… 227

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………… 229

Introductive Speech – Pierpaolo Saporito…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 237

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………. 239

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………… 243

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………….. 245

X Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………….249

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………….251

Themes of the X Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………. 256

Conference report……………………………………………………………………………….. 257

Messages……………………………………………………………………………………………. 286

Final Declaration…………………………………………………………………………………..293

XI Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………..297

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………….299

Themes of the XIth Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………… 305

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………. 306

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………….333

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………….. 339

XII Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………….. 345

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………… 347

Themes of the XII Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………… 352

Introductive Speech: Pierpaolo Saporito – President, OCCAM………………………………………………………………………………………………353

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………. 354

Messages…………………………………………………………………………………………….419

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………….. 420

XIII Infopoverty World Conference……………………………………………………………………………………….427

Agenda………………………………………………………………………………………………. 429

Themes of the 13th Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………….. 432

Conference report…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 433

Final Declaration…………………………………………………………………………………. 466

 XIV Infopoverty World Conference…………………………………………………………………………………………473

Agenda……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 477

Themes of the 14th Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………….. 480

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………….480

Final Declaration……………………………………………………………………………………511

XV Infopoverty World Conference………………………………………………………………………………………….513

Agenda………………………………………………………………………………………………….515

Conference report………………………………………………………………………………….518

Final Declaration…………………………………………………………………………………..531

INDEX OF NAMES……………………………………………………………………………….559

PATRONAGES AND PARTNERS………………………………………………………………………………………….567

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Si annuncia la pubblicazione di

Infopoverty World Conference

15 Years: The Digital Revolution in the words of the lead players”

Sintesi accurata e dettagliata di quanto è stato discusso nel corso delle Conferenze che, con appuntamento annuale, si svolgono in sede ONU al Palazzo di Vetro di New York. Il memorandum introdotto dall’Autore e presentato nel corso di 600 pagine, raccoglie con ordine di esposizione tutti gli interventi che hanno scandito e definito i temi trattati. A concludere il percorso ogni anno, la Final Declaration oltre che sintetizzare quanto affrontato durante le sedute, propone l’agenda di risoluzione delle problematiche avanzate; ulteriore spazio è dedicato alle fotografie più significative dell’esperienza. L’opera rappresenta un’utile e importante summa dell’esperienza di cooperazione tra Nazioni Unite ed OCCAM, tracciandone il percorso affrontato negli ultimi 15 anni di attività.

If you requires further information, feel free to contact us via mail, occam@occam.org
Se avete bisogno di maggiori informazioni, contattateci liberamente via mail all’indirizzo occam@occam.org

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